PumpkinKnits

Monday, January 12, 2009

I Made This!

Like I said earlier, until the last few months weaving never interested me. I would read about it occasionally, but all the terms - warp, DPI, shuttles, heddles, weft, would leave my brain in a fog of confusion and it all just seemed so complicated and technical.

Then, kind of out of no-where I started thinking about it - it might be fun to try. After all, when I first read posts about spinning I was all baffled by the terminology there too - WPI, grist, twist angle - and I managed to figure that out well enough to progress to the point where I can make a pretty damn good yarn, if I do say so myself. So I started poking around - just looking, of course, because really, do I need another past time added to the list? And besides, I'm already pushing the limits of how many spaces in this house I can take over in the name of my "hobbies".

But, you read my previous post, so you know what happens in the end - I researched, I raised funds, and I purchased. And I wove. This is fun stuff, my friends. Just like spinning, the terms lose their intimidating unfamiliarity once you have the materials in front of you to give them context. Obviously, I am a rank beginner, and just like the first lumpy bumpy yarn I made more than three years ago, my first finished piece carries all the hallmarks of that. Also just like my first yarn, I love it!




The warp (the yarn going the length of the fabric) is half Ella Rae Classic in pale blue, and half Arucania Nature Wool in off white. The weft (the yarn that goes back forth the narrow way) is my handspun, "Baked Alaska" romney from HelloYarn Fiber Club. I chose the blue warp to match the blue in this, but didn't have enough to make it all blue. The intent was a scarf, but it is a little too wide and short (8.5" x 50") to be useful as one.

Warping the loom, the part of the process that I thought I would hate, is certainly a little labor intensive, but not nearly as fiddly as I thought it would be. With the kids around, for me, it has to be a post-bedtime activity, as it takes a full hour and I need to have yarn strung halfway across an entire room, which also means I have to get it done in one fell swoop so I'm not barricading access to other parts of the house.

Once warped though, a project (at least a simple plain weave one like I've done here) is very tending-kids friendly, as I can just wander over to the loom if I have a quiet 5 minutes and do a little work. As a project's resting state is reached about every 3 seconds (the time it takes to run the shuttle through and out the other side) it is eminently suited to the constant interruption that takes place when kids are around.

A couple other things I love - the weft uses up so much less yardage than I would expect - the handspun I used here was a mere 2.5oz of yarn! I half half the skein left over - a pleasant surprise. Also, as you can guess, its fast! I really didn't push myself in any way to finish this, I just wove when I had some time over a couple non-work days, and voila!

Cheryl may have made all of us buy Fat Baby Boots, but I'm going to make sure all of you start weaving!

8 Comments:

Blogger Carole Knits said...

It's beautiful. But I will not be learning to weave. I'll get enough joy from watching you!

9:48 AM  
Blogger Rosa said...

I love the colors. Great job. New crafts definitely take a hold on us. I can't wait to see the other creations from your new loom.

11:05 AM  
Blogger Danielle said...

Yes, you are conspiring to make me want a loom!

1:19 PM  
Blogger Manise said...

Awesome! Love the last photo! The word verification was "liker"- I am a "liker" of your weaving is right. :-)

7:33 PM  
Blogger Kathy said...

How cool!

9:35 PM  
Blogger Kathy said...

YOU GOT BOOTS!!!! How do you like them? I love mine!

9:36 PM  
Blogger Laurie said...

Very cool! Almost tempted. But not there.

10:41 PM  
Blogger Kristin said...

Love it! My rigid heddle loom has completely changed the way I look at my stash. Have fun!

11:22 AM  

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